AS in Classical Civilisation H041

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AS in Classical Civilisation H041

The study of Classical Civilisation is highly respected by Universities who look favourably on applicants who can demonstrate knowledge in the Classics. In addition the Oxford College course in Classical Civilisation will help you to; gain knowledge and understanding of the ancient Greek and Roman world through the direct study of ancient art and literature. It will also encourage you to develop an enthusiasm for the Greek and Roman ancient world. This course gives you the chance to form your own personal responses to the art and literature which you study.  It will help you further and enhance your critical and evaluation skills through critical source examination and understanding of good analytical method.

This AS course consists of two units:

  • Unit 1 - F382: Homer’s Odyssey and Society
  • Unit 2 - F384: Greek Tragedy in its’ context

The study of Classical Civilisation is highly respected by Universities who look favourably on applicants who can demonstrate knowledge in the Classics. In addition the Oxford College course in Classical Civilisation will help you to;

  • To gain knowledge and understanding of the ancient Greek and Roman world through the direct study of ancient art and literature.
  • To encourage and develop an enthusiasm for the Greek and Roman ancient world.
  • To give candidates the chance to form their own personal responses to the art and literature which they study.
  • To further and enhance their critical and evaluative skills through critical source examination and understanding of good analytical method.

The AS Units

F382: Homer’s Odyssey and Society

In this unit you will study Homer’s epic poem the Odyssey.

This epic poem ranks among the most important pieces of World literature and this unit will help you to investigate the poem as well as the values and the society it represents. The principal focus of the unit is on a critical analysis of the poem, with a secondary focus on the history, society and archaeology of the period in which it was performed.

Required Text: Homer, Odyssey translated by E V Rieu, revised translation by D C H Rieu (Penguin).

This text can be obtained from a variety of sources. Most bookshops stock a wide range of ancient source material and all of these ancient sources can be read in translation online for free online digital libraries such as Perseus Digital Library.

In studying Homer’s Odyssey you will develop your understanding the distinctive nature of the ancient Greek world.

The themes which you will study in this unit include;

  • Xenia and hospitality
  • the role of the gods and the power of fate
  • the stories and characterisation of heroes
  • the concept of heroism including timé and kleos
  • justice and revenge
  • life and society including the role of women and the role of slaves
  • the oral tradition of the Odyssey
  • the transmission of the texts
  • theories on the composition of the text
  • structure of the text and literary techniques
  • the language of epic including characterisation, supernatural elements, realism and fantasy, disguise and recognition.
  • Nostos (homecoming)

Unit 2: Greek Tragedy in its Context (F384)

In  this unit you will study plays written by three Athenian tragedians. All written in the 5th century BC, the tragic plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides are classic literary works in their own right but are also valuable as social documents for the society and values they represent. It is from the Greek tragedies that many great writers and playwrights take their inspiration, the Antigone for example has been used as the basis for other great poets to build on; including Berholt Brecht and Seamus Heaney. Shakespeare’s plays too are heavily influenced by the plays of the ancient world.

The principal focus of this unit is on the literature, society and values, with a secondary focus on philosophy, religion and history of 5th century Athens as portrayed in the plays.

From September 2014, the following plays will be studied;

  • Aeschylus’ Agamemnon
  • Sophocles’ Antigone
  • Euripides’ Medea and Electra.

The materials you will study in this unit will help you to demonstrate your knowledge of the plays and the cultural context in which they were written.

You will explore;

  • dramatic festivals
  • the role of the gods and fate
  • oracles, omens and prophecies
  • the theme of justice and revenge
  • death and burial
  • honour and reputation
  • the role of men and women in the life of the city
  • the importance of children and the family in tragedy

You will also investigate the theatre itself; the building and the machinery used during the plays, the use of actors and the chorus. The plays concern themes which reveal much about Athenian attitudes towards death and violence and the onstage taboos of portraying such acts.

The way language is used to develop tension and dramatic irony; the nature of tragedy including the development of understanding the technical terms of hamartia, katharsis and peripeteia and the particular styles and approaches characteristic of each of the three tragedians and their contribution to the development of the genre of Greek tragedy.

Required texts:

  • Aeschylus’ Agamemnon
  •  Sophocles’ Antigone
  •  Euripides’ Medea and Electra.
  • Examination Board: OCR

By the end of the AS Level you will have begun to successfully interpret and analyse the ancient literature that you studied. As well as learning about these very interesting literary texts you will develop your ability to successfully handle the ancient literature and be able to transfer what you have learned to critically analyse other written documents.


The format of the Examinations

PLEASE NOTE: All exams will be held during the May - June exam period.

AS Units F382 and F384

Each unit is worth 50% of the total marks available for the AS GCE, and 25% for the A2 GCE if taken. The papers are each 90 minutes long and each carry 100 marks.

Section A: commentary question (45 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of two, each question having three sub sections.

Section B: essay question (55 marks). Candidates answer one question from a choice of three. Bullet point guidance is given for each of the essay questions.

 

What's Included

Online Learning Documentation, Online Resources and Tutor support for 1 year.

Further Information

Your course is delivered online via the Oxford Learning On Campus website.

January 2013 will be the last January exam period. All future exams will be held during the May - June exam period only.

In the student 'On Campus' area you are also able to take part in the student chat room and forums as part of our online student community.

After enrolling online you will receive your username and password to access the On Campus area within 3 working days.

Students are required to arrange and pay for their examinations and manage the course work element if the subject requires this. Students must check the relevant examination board website for further information and final examination sitting dates for the specification.

Materials and support provided by Oxford Learning. Oxford Learning

 

Course Fee

£215.00

Payment by Instalments

Students are able to pay course fees in monthly instalments. Click here to download our instalment plan.

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This product was added to our catalog on Tuesday 05 August, 2008.

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